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Blogging Ethics

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07/22/2019 - 7:09pm

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Last week, Amazon announced a new partnership with the UK’s National Health Service(NHS). In this arrangement, when patients ask their Alexa personal digital assistant health questions, the answers will come from the NHS’s website. Instead of scrolling through pages of web results that include some good sources and some not-so-good-sources, people in the UK will find their answers coming from the nation’s health care provider.

The project could be an important step in helping people with access needs.…

07/22/2019 - 3:57pm

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

 

In May a twitter user posted a picture depicting the muscular system of a female that included milk ducts. It quickly went viral as people realized that in their various health science and anatomy and physiology courses they had never seen a picture of a female muscular system, only a picture of a male muscular system. After thinking back to my own health and anatomy and physiology courses I took during high school and college, I myself was taken aback by the realization that I had never seen a picture like this before.…

07/22/2019 - 1:15pm

Governments that are considering compulsory immunizations must avoid stoking anti-vaccine sentiment, argue Saad B. Omer, Cornelia Betsch and Julie Leask

07/22/2019 - 1:13pm

Those with the least understanding of science oppose it the most and also think they know the most, a study showed

07/22/2019 - 1:11pm

Forced off their parents’ insurance and faced with high insulin prices, young adults dangerously ration, stockpile, and turn to the black market for the medication they need to stay alive

07/22/2019 - 1:08pm

They tried to warn us about the dangers of OxyContin. Almost two decades later, we’re finally listening

07/22/2019 - 3:00am

Until a few days ago, Spain was grappling with a medical futility case. But the conflict may now be moot, since the patient recovered and was discharged.THE PATIENT

Clinicians soon determined that "advanced techniques of resuscitation" which are "aggressive and invasive" should not be used" because they would "not benefit" the patient. Clinicians determined that resuscitation would "generate suffering for the patient without providing a benefit."THE LAWSUIT...

07/22/2019 - 3:00am

Until a few days ago, Spain was grappling with a medical futility case. But the conflict may now be moot, since the patient recovered and was discharged.


THE PATIENT
54-year-old Maria Teresa Blanco suffers from a neuro-degenerative ataxia that keeps her speechless and barely moving. Over the past three years, she has been admitted more than 20 times to Hospital Universitario Principe de Asturias. In early July 2019, she was admitted with sepsis.


THE HOSPITAL
Clinicians soon determined that "advanced techniques of resuscitation" which are "aggressive and invasive" should not be used" because they would "not benefit" the patient. Clinicians determined that resuscitation would "generate suffering for the patient without providing a benefit."


THE LAWSUIT
Maria Teresa's family, represented by the Spanish Association of Christian Lawyers, asked the Court of Instruction No. 6 of Alcalá de Henares to ensure measures are taken to "guarantee Maria Teresa's life." The court granted a temporary restraining order.

The hospital filed its own petition, alleging that the requested measures constituted "therapeutic harassment" that "would not benefit" the patient. The hospital also sought to defend itself against the "intimidating attitude of the family with medical professionals".
(El Pais 1El Pais 2)


07/21/2019 - 3:30am

The third biennial Kaiser Permanente National Bioethics Symposium will be October 3-5, 2019 in Portland, Oregon.