Ethics. Research. Community.

Blogging Ethics

Note: blog content is not currently included in EthicShare's Search Results.

06/13/2017 - 8:00am

This post is part of a series “Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond,” based on an event of the same name hosted at Harvard Law School in April 2017. Background on the series and links to … Continue reading →

06/13/2017 - 3:30am

Before the UK Supreme Court, attorneys for the

Great Ormond Street Hospital argued that the Charlie Gard case is not unique.  On the one hand, they are correct.  British courts have adjudicated dozens of medical futility conflicts, many of them involving children.  On the other hand, the GOSH lawyers are incorrect.  This case has two distinguishing features....

06/13/2017 - 3:30am

Before the UK Supreme Court, attorneys for the

Great Ormond Street Hospital argued that the Charlie Gard case is not unique.  On the one hand, they are correct.  British courts have adjudicated dozens of medical futility conflicts, many o...

06/12/2017 - 10:15pm

As I was reading Laura Turner’s Buzzfeed essay about Christian health sharing ministries this past week, I was startled to discover that Samaritan Ministries, the insurance alternative my husband uses, does not cover expenses related to ectopic pregnancies. In Section VIII of the Samaritan Ministries Guidelines, “Needs Shared by Members,” Ectopic Pregnancies is listed as the ninth item under “Miscellaneous Items Not Shared.” The guidelines... // Read More »

06/12/2017 - 4:48pm

In my latest legal briefing for the Journal of Clinical Ethics, I discuss "Legal Briefing: Unwanted Cesareans and Obstetric Violence."

1.   Epidemic of Unwanted Cesareans...

06/12/2017 - 4:48pm

In my latest legal briefing for the Journal of Clinical Ethics, I discuss "Legal Briefing: Unwanted Cesareans and Obstetric Violence."

A capacitated pregnant woman has a nearly unqualified right to refuse a cesarean section. Her right to say “no” takes precedence over clinicians’ preferences and even over clinicians’ concerns about fetal health. Leading medical societies, human rights organizations, and appellate courts have all endorsed this principle. Nevertheless, clinicians continue to limit reproductive liberty by forcing and coercing women to have unwanted cesareans. This “Legal Briefing” reviews recent court cases involving this type of obstetric violence. I have organized these court cases into the following six categories:
1.   Epidemic of Unwanted Cesareans
2.   Court-Ordered Cesareans
3.   Physician-Coerced Cesareans
4.   Physician-Ordered Cesareans
5.   Cesareans for Incapacitated Patients
6.   Cesareans for Patients in a Vegetative State or Who Are Brain Dead

Legal Briefing: Unwanted Cesareans and Obstetric Violence
Thaddeus Mason Pope, The Journal of Clinical Ethics 28, no. 2 (Summer 2017): 163-73.

06/12/2017 - 1:42pm

This post is part of a series “Healing in the Wake of Community Violence: Lessons from Newtown and Beyond,” based on an event of the same name hosted at Harvard Law School in April 2017. Background on the series and links to … Continue reading →

06/12/2017 - 10:56am

It took an outbreak, a mathematical model and a new law to get immunization rates up in California

06/12/2017 - 10:48am

It was a busy week in housing equity and the law! Here’s the news from the week of June 5-11, 2017: The National Low Income Housing Coalition published Out of Reach 2017, a comprehensive report and tool to assess housing … Continue reading →

06/12/2017 - 10:32am

If there was one misstep that doomed the long and bitter fight by the University of California to wrest key CRISPR patents from the Broad Institute, it was star UC Berkeley scientist Jennifer Doudna’s habit of being scientifically cautious, realistic, and averse to overpromising.